<![CDATA[TAYLOR'S BROTHER VETERANS - Blog]]>Sat, 24 Jun 2017 18:44:59 -0500Weebly<![CDATA[U.S. Army Duster Used In Vietnam War]]>Sun, 09 Feb 2014 01:32:04 GMThttp://oneshotonekill.org/1/post/2014/02/us-army-duster-used-in-vietnam-war.htmlPicture
  1. Duster 40mm automatic canon's.
  2. Rate of fire 120 rounds per minute per canon.
  3. The M42 40 mm Self-Propelled Anti-Aircraft Gun, or "Duster," is an armored light air-defense gun built for the U.S. Army from 1952 until December 1959. Production of this vehicle was performed by the tank division of the General Motors Corporation. It used components from the M41 light tank and was constructed of all welded steel.
  4. A total of 3,700 M42s were built. The vehicle has a crew of six and weighs 22,500 kg (49,500 lb) fully loaded. Maximum speed is 45 mph with a range of 100 miles. Armament consists of fully automatic twin 40 mm M2A1 Bofors, with a rate of fire of 2x120 rounds per minute (rpm) and either a .30 caliber Browning M1919A4 or 7.62mm M60 machine gun. The 500 hp, six-cylinder, Continental (or Lycoming Engines), air-cooled, gasoline engine is located in the rear of the vehicle. It was driven by a cross-drive, 2-speed Allison transmission.
  5. Although the M42 Duster was initially designed for an anti-aircraft role, it proved highly successful when used in the Vietnam War against unarmored ground forces.

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<![CDATA[Carnell Smith My Brother Veteran & Friend]]>Sat, 02 Feb 2013 01:10:30 GMThttp://oneshotonekill.org/1/post/2013/02/carnell-smith-my-brother-veteran-friend.htmlPicture
HUGH R. TAYLOR 1ST SFG\ABN OKINAWA, JAPANTuesday, October 02, 2007 - 5:56 AM
GUARDIAN ANGEL
SMITTY I AM SORRY I DIDN'T GET A CHANCE TO TELL YOU GOODBY BEFORE YOU LEFT. I AM PUTTING YOU IN MY PRAYERS EVERY NIGHT AND YOUR UNIT TOO! I HOPE YOU LIKE 
WHAT I HAVE DONE ON MY SITE WITH YOUR PICS AND THIS SALUTE TO YOU. HEY BUDDY THIS IS PERSO0NAL FROM ONE VET TO ANOTHER VET IN ARMS. STAY ALERT, WATCH 
YOUR ASS, & WHEN IN DOUBT DON'T HESITATE TO TAKE EM! OUT. MY THOUGHTS AND MY SPECIAL PRAYER TO GOD WILL KEEP YOU SAFE. I AM HONORED TO GIVE YOU THIS SALUTE, BECAUSE ANYONE GOING ON THEIR 3rd TOUR IN A HOSTILE COMBAT ZONE CERTAINLY DESERVES IT. 

YOUR BROTHER AND FREIND FOR LIFE: HUGH R. TAYLOR 1ST SFG\ABN
HUGH R. TAYLOR 1ST SFG\ABN,10TH SFG\ABN, 588TH COMBAT ENG BATT. VIETNAMWednesday, September 19, 2007 - 5:36 PM
SALUTE TO CARNELL SMITH CPL (WEAPONS NOMENCLATURE)
USMC Infantry. 3rd Battalion 4th Marines. Kilo Company. Baghdad-Fallujah 2003,2004,2005. Grunts make it happen!! Armed with M16A4/M203 Grenade Launcher fitted with ACOG (advanced combat optical gunsite), PEQ2A (for night vision muzzle alignment) and PSQ18A (new PEQ2A module for sighting in M203 Grenade Launcher with night vision gaugles on). What a beautiful weapon!

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<![CDATA[My Dad Hugh O Taylor USAF]]>Sat, 02 Feb 2013 01:06:12 GMThttp://oneshotonekill.org/1/post/2013/02/my-dad-hugh-o-taylor-usaf.htmlPicture
HUGH R.TAYLOR 1ST SFG\ABN, 10TH SFG\ABN, 588TH COMBAT ENG BAT.Friday, October 05, 2007 - 6:34 PM
TRIBUTE TO MY DAD
MY DAD SERVED FROM SEPT. 25TH, 1935 TO OCT. 28TH, 1957 WITH THE UNITED STATES AIR FORCE. HE SERVED IN WORLD WAR TWO AND THE KOREAN WAR. HE WAS 
BASED AT McCOY AIR FORCE BASE IN ORLANDO FLA, SELLFRIDGE AIR FORCE BASE MICH, AND WRIGHT PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE IN OHIO. HE WAS WITH THE 
STRATEGIC AIR COMMAND DURING HIS SERVICE. HE FLEW AS CREW CHEIF IN B-17'S, B-47'S, AND B-52'S. HE TOLD ME ABOUT A STORY DURING WORLD WAR TWO ABOUT SEVERAL B-17'S THAT WERE HEADED FOR AUSTRAILIA ON A MISSION, IN WHICH HIS AIRCRAFT WAS THE ONLY ONE TO MAKE IT TO THEIR DESTINATION. NO ONE KNOWS WHAT 
HAPPENED TO THE OTHER AIRCRAFT. 
I AM PROUD TO BE HIS SON AND I FOLLOWED IN HIS FOOTSTEPS WHEN I SERVED IN VIETNAM 1968, OKINAWA, LATE 1968 TO 1970, AND BACK IN THE STATES 
AT FT. DEVENS MASS. WITH 10TH SFG\ABN TO FINISH MY HITCH. 
SIGNED: HUGH R. TAYLOR 1ST SFG\ABN, 10TH SFG\ABN, 588TH COMBAT ENG BAT. VIETNAM 1968

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<![CDATA[They Fight For Our Freedom & Other's Around The World]]>Thu, 31 Jan 2013 03:12:32 GMThttp://oneshotonekill.org/1/post/2013/01/they-fight-for-our-freedom-others-around-the-world.htmlPicture
THIS SALUTE WAS PRESENTED TO ME BY CPL. CARNELL SMITH, FOR
ONE OF HIS WOUNDED BROTHER'S HE SERVED WITH IN IRAQ. MAY
GOD BLESS LCPL. MICHAEL TOBY FOR HIS DEVOTION TO DUTY &
HIS PERSONAL SACRIFICE FOR HIS COUNTRY.

GOD BE WITH HIM & HIS FAMILY FOR A SPEEDY RECOVERY. I HOPE
EVERYONE WHO VISITS MY SITE MIGHT UNDERSTAND WHAT OUR
SOLDIER'S IN THE PAST & PRESENT HAVE DONE FOR US & THE 
SACRIFICE THEY HAVE MADE FOR ALL OF US !!!!!


CPL. CARNELL SMITHFriday, November 30, 2007 - 4:44 PM
SALUTE TO LCPL. MICHAEL TOBY, USMC
LCPL Michael Toby, USMC Machine Gunner, wounded by Iraqi indirect fire (unsure if it was arty or mortars) on April 7, 2003 during the assault on Baghdad. He was wounded when we received indirect fire at the Diyala Bridge prior to crossing the bridge and proceeding to head to Baghdad, which was 7 miles away. Toby was awarded the Purple Heart, sustained massive leg injuries, was from Montana, and held the rank of Lance Corporal (LCPL). This photo was taken by one of the photographers from a major publication, that was embedded in our unit when we crossed the Iraqi border, and displays the comaraderie of Infantry Marines in combat coming together to take care of one of their own during a Med Evac. 


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<![CDATA[Patriot Beyond The Call Of Duty]]>Thu, 31 Jan 2013 02:47:07 GMThttp://oneshotonekill.org/1/post/2013/01/patriot-beyond-the-call-of-duty.htmlPicture
THIS MEMORIAL WAS PRESENTED TO ME FROM A BROTHER
VETERAN CPL. CARNELL SMITH FOR HIS BEST FRIEND CPL.
DANIEL AMAYA, WHO GAVE ALL A SOLDIER CAN GIVE FOR
HIS COUNTRY. MAY GOD BLESS DANIEL & HIS FAMILY
FOR HIS DEVOTION TO DUTY &  SACRIFICE, HE WILL NOT
BE FORGOTTEN !!!!!


CPL. CARNELL SMITHFriday, November 30, 2007 - 4:15 PM
MEMORIAL FOR CPL. DANIEL AMAYA
1. R.I.P. - CPL Daniel Amaya's memorial. KIA 11 April 2004 in Fallujah, Iraq just days after the Blackwater guys were murdered there. He was 22 from Odessa, Texas. He was a Marine Rifleman, Squad Leader, with the rank of Corporal. His memorial reads: "He lead from the front." He served with the 3rd Battalion, 4th Marines Kilo Company, 3rd Platoon aka "The Dirty Third- Raid Platoon." Was shot in the neck while clearing a room during house-to-house sweep of Fallujah in April 2004 before ceasefire was called by politicians. EVERY STEP I TAKE HE TAKES WITH ME, UNTIL THE END. 
        


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<![CDATA[Carnell Smith Interview with Vietnam Vet Hugh R Taylor]]>Wed, 30 Jan 2013 01:07:35 GMThttp://oneshotonekill.org/1/post/2013/01/carnell-smith-interview-with-vietnam-vet-hugh-r-taylor.htmlPicture
Carnell Smith
AMH2020.A001
June 11, 2007



    The Vietnam War was a significant event that will forever resonate throughout the history of the United States of America. The war was officially fought between 1964 and 1973 involving conventional United States military forces (Vietnam Online). This conflict sought to prevent the spread of communism from North Vietnam into the democratic realms of South Vietnam. Official statistics of American lives lost are hard to accurately report because of the complex accountability problems in recording those designated Missing in Action (MIA) or captured as Prisoners of War (POWs). However, over War (Vietnam War Casualties). Mired in domestic U.S. movements involving civil rights and the anti-war protesters, many Vietnam veterans returned home to ridicule, chaos, and the bitter reality that in some ways the war was actually lost. Some wondered if their personal sacrifices might have been in vain. One such Vietnam veteran is Mr. Randy Taylor.
    Now sixty years old, and working as a Security Officer at the Lockheed Martin Missile & Fire Control facility in Orlando, Florida, Randy Taylor experienced the carnage of the Vietnam war from its most dramatic viewpoint: on the ground. As an Army Combat Eng Veteran trained in ground level combat and extensive handling of automatic weapons, and explosives ordnance disposal Taylor experienced some of the horrific battles in Vietnam that Hollywood films only wish they could emulate. Recently, the former explosives expert and now grandfather, sat down to recall his memoirs of the conflict and how it changed his life forever.
    Clean-shaven and still as lean as he probably was during his days as an airborne soldier, the title bestowed upon a paratrooper,
which he obtained on Okinawa after being attached to the 1st Special Forces Group.  Taylor was drafted into the U.S. Army after high school. When asked if he was upset about being drafted, he answers with a straight face: “No, I wanted to do my patriotic duty.” It is quite amazing to meet such a brave man, who unrelentingly answered his country’s call to duty, given unbeknownst consequences. 

 Even more so amazing to meet a man who volunteered to join an elite element of the military, in which he knew he ran the risk of being maimed or mortally wounded in the crux of ground combat.
    With the official title of Explosive Ordinance Specialist, and the rank of Spec. 4, Mr. Taylor was apart of the 588th Combat Eng. Batt-
allion that was primarily based in South Vietnam. Randy actually served in Vietnam  in 1968 and believes wholeheartedly that at the time he was preventing the spread of communism for the people of South Vietnam. “Communism,” Taylor says “is what I consider to be living in a socialist state under a dictatorship. The people [literally] have no voice.” 
In terms of alliances during the Vietnam conflict, the United States, The Republic of Vietnam (South), New Zealand, Australia, and South Korea formed a coalition to ward of the communistic threats of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North) and the National Liberation Front (NLF) which was a group of South-Vietnamese communist guerillas. The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) is said to have provided military support to the North Vietnamese Army (NVA), although there were never any conventional Soviet troops provided to support them (Vietnam War Casualties). 
Taylor describes Vietnam, or “Nam” as the veterans of his day called it, as “a beautiful country, with part of the country wanting to be free and the rest of the people wanting a socialist state.” He says he never had the opportunity to conduct any patrols or missions with any soldiers from the Army of the Republic of Vietnam (ARVN) - those South Vietnamese soldiers with whom U.S. forces were fighting with, but he respected most of them because they understood their duty to protect their country. A typical,  mellow dramatic day for Randy and his unit of Combat Engineer's would involve waking at 0530 hrs (5:30 a.m.) to the sound of B-52 bomber planes dropping simultaneously around his base camp to ward off any suspecting enemy personnel. This was followed by dressing, breakfast (chow), and the systematic job of sweeping the roadways around his base camp for landmines that the North Vietnamese might have planted overnight. Clearly, this was not the typical nine to five form of employment that young men his age experienced back in the United States!
Most notably of Taylor’s tenure in Vietnam was a particular incident prior to the the heralded Tet Offensive of 1968, in which North Vietnamese soldiers tried vehemently to attack U.S. personnel and bases throughout Vietnam, under the guise of their celebrated national holiday. “My base camp was over run,” remembers Taylor matter-of-factly. “The 101st Airborne was flown in to help us keep our base from falling into enemy hands.” 
Upon returning home to the U.S. following his tour in Vietnam, Taylor admits that he suffered from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), which caused him to have flashbacks of his experiences, and to occasionally jump at the sound of a car backfiring or other erratic noises. In terms of disabilities, Taylor now says he suffers from a loss of hearing “due to the explosives,” he came into contact with. When asked the monumental question of whether or not he felt the war was lost, Taylor believes the actual combat portion of the war--in terms of destruction and annihilation of enemy forces--was won without question. “But, the political outcome,” he laments, “was lost!” Spoken like a true war veteran, Randy says he was not overly upset that it took so many years for the Vietnam War to end, because “that’s what happens in prolonged war!”
On the subject of confronting anti-war protesters upon his return home, Taylor says he was “once spit on by a man in a crowd of demonstrators at the Honolulu [Hawaii] Airport when [he] was on R&R (Rest & Relaxation periods away from the war).” While respecting their right to freedom of speech, Taylor feels that most anti-war protesters “don’t have a clue what it takes to keep our freedom.” He even goes so far as to call former Democratic Presidential candidate and Vietnam veteran John Kerry “a traitor to his country,” for his participation in anti-war rallies following his participation in the conflict.
Pertaining to contemporary matters involving politics and the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Randy appears adamant about the current situation saying, “we need to stay and win, or we will have terrorists on our door steps.” Furthermore, in response to the interventionist ploys of politicians in the handling of Iraq, Taylor again does not hesitate to retort: 
“Politicians should be able to initiate the wars, but the military command should have the power to tell Congress and the President when to end the war.”
Following this interview with Mr. Randy Taylor, my view of the Vietnam War has not really changed much. Although I will admit that I did not fully understand all of the background information pertaining to the actual alliances and elements of the war, I still believe and can justify my belief from the death toll statistics, that this was one long and bloody war that will never be forgotten by Americans. The fact that Mr. Taylor wholeheartedly believed in his mission of stopping the spread of communism is not much different from my divine belief in my mission in Iraq during three tours as a U.S. Marine Rifleman. I am forever grateful for having the opportunity to have met and interviewed a man like Randy Taylor, and will forever share his comradeship as Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) that the domestic American populace did not always believe in, support, or understand. In closing, I think former President Richard Nixon explained the Vietnam War best in his 1985 quote: “No event in American history is more misunderstood than the Vietnam War. It was misreported then, and it is misremembered now” (Vietnamwar.net).
58,000 Americans are listed as having been killed or gone missing as a result of the Vietnam War.


Works Cited

Taylor, Randy. Personal Interview. 31 May 2007.
“Vietnam Online. An online companion to Vietnam: A Television History.” PBS.org. 30 May     2007<http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/vietnam/timeline/index.html>.
“Vietnam War Casualties.” Vietnam-war.info. 29 May 2007<http://www.vietnam-    war.info/casualties/>. 
“Vietnamwar.net: Educational, Entertainment, and Research Material Relevant to the             Study of the Vietnam War. Vietnamwar.net. 29 May  2007     <http://www.vietnamwar.net/history.htm>




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<![CDATA[Black Virgin Mountain Nui Ba Den Vietnam War]]>Mon, 07 Jan 2013 01:05:04 GMThttp://oneshotonekill.org/1/post/2013/01/black-virgin-mountain-nui-ba-den-vietnem-war.htmlPicture
Nui Ba Den
Tuesday, June 03, 2008 - 4:02 PM
THIS MOUNTAIN WAS APPROXIMATELY 15 CLICKS SOUTH WEST
OF MY BASE CAMP DAU TIENG. DAU TIENG WAS A SMALL
FIRE BASE THAT PROVIDED FIRE MISSIONS FOR THE
TROOPS AT THE TOP AND THE BOTTOM OF THE
MOUNTAIN. THE ENEMY OWNED THE MIDDLE OF THE
MOUNTAIN. THIS MOUNTAIN IS NOW A BEAUTIFUL TOURIST
ATTRACTION PRESENT DAY.

SOUNDS KIND OF CRAZY AFTER 58,000 OF MY BROTHERS
DIED MAKING IT SO. GOD BLESS OUR TROOPS FOREVER.
SIGNED: HUGH R. TAYLOR 1ST SFG\ABN,10TH SFG\ABN,
& 588TH COMBAT ENG BATTALION VIETNAM 1968.
patrick Sderna 75th Inf. Ranger LRRP 25th DivWednesday, January 02, 2013 - 2:31 PM
time on the mountain
My unit and i spent nearly 3 months up ther in June-Aug. 17 1968. the night we were replaced by Wolfhounds, they were overrun and suffered huge casualties. they also fought bravely and inflicted great loss to the enemy. we lost one radio man Pvt. Sewell My unit had been redeployed to Tay Hihn and were under constant movement to find and gather intel concerning the offensive. I was with one of the only teams to ever make it from the top to the bottom of the mountain on a recon mission.. Very scary place and coveted by the allies as well as the North and Viet cong.
John RogerFriday, May 27, 2011 - 11:59 AM
Black Virgin Mountain. battles around the bottom of the mountain
I would like to know more about the battles around the bottom of the mountain?? Please if you were with a infantry unit that did battles around the bottom
E-mail me. and tell me your stories... rezonemn@yahoo.com
Vern Donoho Sunday, March 13, 2011 - 10:19 PM
Black virgin mountain
I was stationed with the 196th 21st C company as I remember.. Would of arrived shortly after spending Christmas at Long Ben after entering country. I remember operation Grand Junction but can't remember if that was my first operation? What I remember most was, after a chopper crashed up on the side of the mountain, we were assigned the task of going up to recover the bodies. The crash had happened much closer to the top but there were not enough guys up there to recover the bodies. So, away we went! We all knew without doubt that if we survived this, we would never forget the experience. The idea of getting to the spot without Charlie getting on our case never occurred to us and we n
Knew for sure if we made it there, they would be waiting for us. What we found was that the climb up that mountain of Brandt boulders was the toughest job that was ever to be given to us! We finally did make it to the site of the crash without seeing any enemy but it was so late in the day that we were going to have to spend the night there.. Sleeping on rocks a few hours and standing guard the rest of the night, we somehow finally seen the sun come up. After much work, the bodies were recovered and put in body bags to be extracted by a chopper.. For some reason, I seem to remember very strong winds the bodies could not be extracted so we had to carry the bodies back down the side of that mountain! Trying to come down the side of that mountain with three bodies in bags that had been burned so bad was no easy task... Seems to me it took about 4 men on each body and the rest were spread out in-between them to provide as much protection as possible. Everyone was dealing with total exhaustion and yet we had to go on so we wouldn't have to spend another night out there.. F

Al TavolacciFriday, March 04, 2011 - 10:55 AM
The Mountain
Gary Divis, I also went to the mountain 2 weeks after May 13 I was also with the 121st sig I painted THE BIG RED ONE on the rock outside the hooch. not to say how many sand bags we filled. I remember talking to the mail clerck who servived the attack. I can"t say i remember you but that was many moons ago.
Michael CheathamMonday, September 20, 2010 - 12:55 PM
Quarry by 362nd Light Equipment Co
In 1970 as a 1st Lt, I ran a quarry to provide material for the construction of Highway One. I provided rock material for the Rock crushers, road, asphalt Plant and, concrete plant. We were always getting fired at from unknown positions in the midsection of the mountain. I thought it to be the strangest thing to control the top and bottom and not the middle sections. I understand it could not be bombed or destroyed because it was some sort of religious shrine. I almost died out there one evening. I had been assigned to the asphalt plant for a couple of weeks and before I reported to my Co apon returning I wanted to check on my men at Nui Ba Dinh. It was a winding road off of Highway One to the mountain and many areas of the road had growth concealing it. As I proceeded down the road a young vietnamese boy kept jumping in front of my jeep to prevent me from gong to the mountain that day. I always gave him candy and food for his family so I could not figure out why he was acting this way. He finally convinced me to listen to him by jumping in the jeep and clinging to me tightly. Had I gone another 50 yards I would have been ambushed and killed along with my driver. My men had already left after coming under heavy fire and the only thing going on out there was charlie waiting in ambush. I owe that boy my life and I made sure he was well taken catre of.
Jerry Camelleri 75th RangersWednesday, August 18, 2010 - 9:39 PM
Night at the temple Summer 1969
We had a heavy team of 8 walk to the temple to pull surveillance on the Cou Dai temple. No problem getting there. Was awe struck by the beauty and the destruction from previous battles there. There were drums of CS powered all around. We sleep half in the temple and half out for guard duty. Next day we found the NVA and VC walking about like we were not there.

How do we get out? If we walk up to the top, we’re great targets. If we walk down it’s most likely booby trapped. We called in Hueys but they could not land due to the steep terrain. They secured 100 foot ropes to the cargo rings in the floor with two rangers inside. The ropes were thrown out and we latched in using stabo rigs and D rings.

4 of us hooked up. The chopper couldn’t maneuver like it should. It went straight up and laterally so not to throw us around. The chopper took 15 rounds and disabled the hydraulics. Now the chopper could not land. 3 of us and myself were still hanging underneath from the ropes. We were swing around and turning upside down, some hanging from their knees.

As we approached Tay Ninh base camp the chopper slowed to 30 MPH forward speed and 30 MPH down speed. As we hit the rice paddy, our guys in the chopper slashed the ropes. A medivac chopper came in to pick up the pieces but we were fine because the rice paddy was dry like talcum powder.

The chopper went in to make an airplane landing, the skids pulling waves of sparks from the metal corrugate.

Lucky to be alive but that is my experience with the Black Virgin.


Ronald L. Strout 587TH. SIGNAL COMPANY(SUPPORT)2ND BN. 1SIGNAL BRIG.Friday, June 04, 2010 - 8:25 PM
BLACK VIRGIN MOUNTAIN-TAY NINH-1969
WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM ANYONE THAT WAS IN MY COMPANY AT THE TOP OR BOTTOM OF THE MOUNTAIN IN 1969. IS THERE A WEBSITE FOR THE 587 SIGNAL COMPANY??? THERE SHOULD BE,WE KICKED SOME VC ASS. MY E-MAIL ADDRESS IS: rstrout1@roadrunner.com I HOPE TO HEAR FROM SOMEONE WHO KNOW ME.
Rudy Frausto (Flip)Wednesday, April 28, 2010 - 3:20 PM
Nui Ba Dinh
I was with the first units that went up on top in Oct of 1967. 194th M.P. Co, 1st Signal Brigade attached to 125th Signal, 25th Infantry Division. Was up there from Oct to Jan of '68, went down for about a month and got sent back up in mid Feb. I was there til the 23rd of May, 10 days after we got over run. Use to have alot of slides and photos taken on top, but some REMF sgt stole them from me. Just wanted to straigthen something out about that night. The intiial explosions that night, the 13th, were satchel charges the VC or NVA threw at me near my bunker #2. Motors followed from the gully below bunker 17. I listen to them torture Cousins who was in bunker #3. Anyone there that night, please contact me here. I'm looking for Tommy Duffy. He was my hootchmate that night. I will check back for response.

Love, Respect & Brotherhood
Gary DavisThursday, April 08, 2010 - 5:48 AM
Nui Ba Dinh
Spent almost my entire tour from just after the attack in '68 to May '69 on the lovely lady... at least she was during the daytime. I was part of a small group of 4 troops from the 1st Inf 121 Sig Batt. assigned to the mountain to run a radio relay station. One of the funniest times up there was when a drunken chopper pilot decided that he wanted to drop in for a beer. problem was that it was the rainy season and we were completely socked in the clouds. He told us just to throw some flares, he would find the landing pad..... and he did. I found this site as I was looking up the spelling for a VA form that I have to fill out. Can't believe that they turned it into a tourist attaction... although if the pagoda and some of the stone carving survived, it would make for some interesting speculation on what went on. In fact, I wonder if the rock I carved my name in and the Big Red One are still there? Lots of stories... some good, some bad - but all rememberable.....If you get current day pictures of the place....post them.
Bruce L. Van VessemMonday, March 22, 2010 - 6:10 PM
Nui Ba Den '71-'72
I was with the 535th Signal Co. on the top from around Nov to Feb. Anyone there at that time.
Sgt .Dan Wicks 1876 Comm Sq USAFTuesday, January 12, 2010 - 3:52 PM
Interesting veiw of war 1971 & 72
There was 13 American, with Arvin guarding us, I spent my 23rd birthday there in July of 71, we had quite a veiw. The wooley pets were aways hitting the sides. Ounce they caught the grass on fire, it started blowing some of mines on perimiter. We had gunships, F4's, Cobras, and other, planes working out on side of mountian most of time. Also spent New Year.there, 71-72 I also spent a week trying to get radio there in Oct 71, the mountain was clouded in, and when that broke the wind was high, chopper couldn't land, trying to land in wind very interesting. Altogether spent about 2 months there, have a lot of memeries of place, for me none to bad. If anyone was there that time please contact, through this blog I will check, time to time.



Rudy Frausto (Flip)Wednesday, April 28, 2010 - 3:20 PM
Nui Ba Dinh
I was with the first units that went up on top in Oct of 1967. 194th M.P. Co, 1st Signal Brigade attached to 125th Signal, 25th Infantry Division. Was up there from Oct to Jan of '68, went down for about a month and got sent back up in mid Feb. I was there til the 23rd of May, 10 days after we got over run. Use to have alot of slides and photos taken on top, but some REMF sgt stole them from me. Just wanted to straigthen something out about that night. The intiial explosions that night, the 13th, were satchel charges the VC or NVA threw at me near my bunker #2. Motors followed from the gully below bunker 17. I listen to them torture Cousins who was in bunker #3. Anyone there that night, please contact me here. I'm looking for Tommy Duffy. He was my hootchmate that night. I will check back for response.

Love, Respect & Brotherhood
Gary DavisThursday, April 08, 2010 - 5:48 AM
Nui Ba Dinh
Spent almost my entire tour from just after the attack in '68 to May '69 on the lovely lady... at least she was during the daytime. I was part of a small group of 4 troops from the 1st Inf 121 Sig Batt. assigned to the mountain to run a radio relay station. One of the funniest times up there was when a drunken chopper pilot decided that he wanted to drop in for a beer. problem was that it was the rainy season and we were completely socked in the clouds. He told us just to throw some flares, he would find the landing pad..... and he did. I found this site as I was looking up the spelling for a VA form that I have to fill out. Can't believe that they turned it into a tourist attaction... although if the pagoda and some of the stone carving survived, it would make for some interesting speculation on what went on. In fact, I wonder if the rock I carved my name in and the Big Red One are still there? Lots of stories... some good, some bad - but all rememberable.....If you get current day pictures of the place....post them.
Bruce L. Van VessemMonday, March 22, 2010 - 6:10 PM
Nui Ba Den '71-'72
I was with the 535th Signal Co. on the top from around Nov to Feb. Anyone there at that time.
Sgt .Dan Wicks 1876 Comm Sq USAFTuesday, January 12, 2010 - 3:52 PM
Interesting veiw of war 1971 & 72
There was 13 American, with Arvin guarding us, I spent my 23rd birthday there in July of 71, we had quite a veiw. The wooley pets were aways hitting the sides. Ounce they caught the grass on fire, it started blowing some of mines on perimiter. We had gunships, F4's, Cobras, and other, planes working out on side of mountian most of time. Also spent New Year.there, 71-72 I also spent a week trying to get radio there in Oct 71, the mountain was clouded in, and when that broke the wind was high, chopper couldn't land, trying to land in wind very interesting. Altogether spent about 2 months there, have a lot of memeries of place, for me none to bad. If anyone was there that time please contact, through this blog I will check, time to time.



Ivan KatzenmeierSaturday, November 28, 2009 - 1:32 PM
13 MAY 1968 MASSACRE ON NUI BA DINH, BLACK VIRGIN MOUNTAIN

I HAVE A BLOG DESCRIBING THE 13 MAY 1968 MASSACRE ON THIS MOUNTAIN. GO TO: http://katzenmeier.wordpress.com/2009/11/12/the-nui-ba-den-massacre/

Jim PardoThursday, May 28, 2009 - 6:19 AM
NUI BA DINH
In November of 1967 our platoon (25th MP Co) escorted a convoy around Nui Ba Dinh to the Old French Fort. We drew sporadic rifle fire and returned same off and on during the entire trip. We never saw the enemy due to the dense jungle/forest around us. I am not sure what the mission was or the reason for going to the Old French Fort. Possibly to resupply troops who flushed out the enemy at the base of the mountain. Some troops were ferried in on hueys. We were there for several days then convoyed out to Tay Ninh. Most of the time, our leaders never informed us of the reason for the mission. I think that the VC knew more about our mission then the average soldier. Sometimes we never knew exactly where we were. Some obscure village or remote area on a grid map, but that was it. It sure would have been nice if we were told what the purpose of our mission was, but that was seldom the case. Probably one of the reasons we left Vietnam to finish their own war!
IVAN KATZENMEIERSaturday, April 11, 2009 - 6:45 PM
NUI BA DINH, BLACK VIRGIN MOUNTAIN
I SPENT A MONTH ON TOP OF NUI BA DINH, THE MONTH AFTER IT WAS OVERRUN. I WILL HAVE A VIDEO ON YOUTUBE SOON, WITH PHOTOS OF THE BLACK VIRGIN. CHECK OUT MY BLOG ABOUT THE AMBUSH AT AP NHI, WHICH WAS IN THIS AREA. GO TO:http://katzenmeier.wordpress.com/
John HendersonSaturday, January 10, 2009 - 7:51 PM
The Black lady
I was on her in 1968,18th of August when we were overrun, lucky to be here. Yes, I have pictures of this and a Bronze star that wouldn"t buy me a coffee! I say the lady has changed and so have I. Was missing in action up there because when I was ordered to take commmand of a bunker that was blown up they pulled the wire behind me and just forgot to releave me. It was a terrible night alone. Have alot to tell. Was with the 587th signal co(support} from Tay nin base camp just to fill sand bags around the equipment when all hell broke loose. I live in Ohio. address is 1696 S. Jeannie Dr. Marblehead, ohio 43440 Also had many wives but not at the same time, HAHA! I think all wives should come with a manual.


Hugh R. Taylor 588TH COMBAT ENG BATTALLION RVN 1968Wednesday, November 21, 2007 - 1:54 PM
BLACK VIRGIN MOUNTAIN ( NUI BA DINH )
WOULD LIKE TO HEAR FROM ANYONE THAT WAS NEAR THE MOUNTAIN AND SOME OF YOUR STORIES OR COMMENTS ABOUT THIS MOUNTAIN. I WAS STATIONED AT A SMALL
FIRE BASE ABOUT 15 CLICKS NORTHEAST OF THE BLACK VIRGIN MOUNTAIN. OUR FIRE BASE SUPPORTED THE TROOPS THAT WERE BASED AT THE TOP AND THE BOTTOM OF THE MOUNTAIN. I HAD SOME BEAUTIFUL PICTURES FLYING OVER THE MOUNTAIN IN A HUEY BUT MY DUMB ASS SECOND WIFE THREW THEM AWAY. OH! WELL ALOT OF VETS CAN RELATE TO HAVING SEVERAL MARRIAGES THAT DIDN'T WORK, A COMMON THING AMONGST VETS. I HEAR THE BLACK VIRGIN MOUNTAIN IS A TOURIST ATTRACTION NOW. FUNNY
THING HOW THAT WORKS OUT AFTER A WAR THAT TOOK SO MANY OF MY BROTHERS AWAY. I SURE HOPE TO HEAR SOME COMMENTS FROM ANYONE WHO CAN RELATE TO ANY OF THESE SUBJECTS I HAVE MENTIONED HERE. ANYONE CAN COMMENT ON THIS IF HE OR SHE HAS ANY FACTUAL KNOWLEDGE OF THESE AREAS OF CONVERSATION. AGAIN I HOPE TO HEAR FROM SOMEONE.

THANKS TO MY BROTHERS FOR THEIR SERVICE: HUGH R. TAYLOR 1ST SFG\ABN, 10TH SFG\ABN, 588TH COMBAT ENG BATT. 1968 RVN

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<![CDATA[Camp Hardy Staff 1st SFG/ABN]]>Mon, 07 Jan 2013 00:58:36 GMThttp://oneshotonekill.org/1/post/2013/01/camp-hardy-staff-1st-sfgabn.htmlPicture
Camp Hardy Staff
CAMP HARDY WAS SET UP ONLY FOR GREEN BERETS,
NAVY SEALS, MARINE FORCE RECON, AIR FORCE
COMMANDO'S, AND OTHER SELECT GROUPS WHO WENT THRU THIS
CAMP BEFORE THEY WENT TO VIETNAM.

THIS WAS THE MOST ELITE CAMP OF IT'S KIND DURING THE
VIETNAM WAR. IN FACT I WOULD SAY IT WAS THE MOST
SOFISTICATED JUNGLE WARFARE TRAINING IN THE
WORLD DURING THAT TIME PERIOD.

SIGNED HUGH R. TAYLOR 1ST SFG\ABN

I love the picture. It give us courage to be a better soldier not in the battle field but a soldier of our nation. It is a fair credut to us all.
marcieFriday, November 28, 2008 - 11:54 AM

HELLO MR TAYLOR, I AM THE DAUGHTER OF ROGER L. MCFARLIN, MY FATHER WAS ALSO @ CAMP HARDY..HE HAS PICTURES OF HIM STANDING IN FRONT OF THE ARMS ROOM, AND THE DATE OF THE PICTURE IS MAY 1969, BUT I BELIVE HE WAS THERE FROM JAN 1969, HE HAS ALSO PICTURES OF THE BEACH, ON THE BACK THERE ARE A FEW LINES...HE DESCRIBES BRIEFLY THAT IN THE PICTURE THE BOAT IS FROM CAMP HARDY AND HE IS ON A ISLAND SCUBA DIVING.....ALSO STATING THAT THEY CAMPED OUT THERE AND THE ISLAND IS ONLY ONE MILE LONG...OTHER PICTURE ON BACK STATING GETTING READY FOR NIGHT OPERATIONS CLEANING WEAPONS AND GETTING AMMO TOGETHER ALSO STATES AROUND CAMP WEARING BLACK CAPS INSTED OF THE GREEN BARET IN THE PICTURE HE IS STANDING INFRONT OF A WOOD PANEL WITH A ROUND SIGN WITH THE WRITING AIRBORNE AND CAMP HARDY COMBAT TRNGCTR...I WOULD BE GREATFUL IF YOU BY ANY CHANCE REMEMBER HIM...AND TELL ME THE MISSIONS THAT HE WAS INVOLVED IN YOU SEE, I LEARNED FROM MY FATHER ALL THE FOUNDEMENTALS TO BECOME AN ADULT WITH MORALS, RESPECT FOR OTHERS, TO BE HONEST, AND HE MADE US A STRONG FAMILY WITH BONDING THAT NO MATTER WHAT WOULD HAPPEN WE WOULD GE THROUGH IT TOGETHER, THE ONLY THING THAT HE WOULD NEVER WANT TO TALK ABOUT WAS VIETNAM, EVEN THOUGH BECAUSE OF HIS SERVICE FOR HIS COUTRY MADE HIM MY HERO, AND MADE ME SO PROUD THAT HE IS MY DAD....FROM MY MOM THROUGH THE YEARS I LEARNED HE WAS WOUNDED TWICE,,,HE DOES HAVE 2 PURPLE HEARTS...HE LEFT 1ST SFG AND WAS ASSIGNED TO 173RD ABN BDE 503RD CO A 4 IN SEP 1970 WAS WITH THEM FOR A MONTH WENT TO CO E 4TH BN 503RD AND I BELIVE THAT IS WHEN HE WAS WOUNDED AND ALMOST KILLED BECAUSE HIS PURPLE HEART CERTIFICATE STATED WOUNDED IN DEC OF 1970.....NEXT ENTRY IS PATIENT USAH FT LERNEWOOD MISSOURI WENT ON WITH THE 504TH THAN 509TH ABCT MET MY MOTHER IN ITALY WAS MP THAN CID RETIRED AS CID FT HOOD TX AFTER A LIFE OF SERVICE...I LOST MY HERO LAST YEAR ON FEB THE 1ST FRON LYMPHOMA HE WAS ONLY 60 YRS OLD..THAT IS WHEN I STARTED GETTING INFO FROM HIS MILITARY ORDERS TO WHERE HE WAS AND WHAT HE DID.....I AM SO PROUD OF HIM AND OF YOU AS WELL FOR SERVING OUR COUNTRY..THANK YOU...WELL ENOUGH OF MY TALKING YOUR EAR OFF..BASICALLY I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW FROM YOU IF YOU KNOW HOW HE GOT WOUNDED AND WHAT HE DID....HE HAS A PATCH THAT HAS A V AND RECONDO WRITTEN ON IT WENT ON HIS SLEEVE I BELIVE......I THANK YOU FOR LISTENING TO ME AND HOPEFULLY YOU CAN HELP ME.....SINCERELY MARCIE MCFARLIN HIS NICKNAME WAS "EASY MAC"
HUGH R. TAYLOR 1ST SFG\ABN OKINAWA, JAPANTuesday, June 03, 2008 - 3:35 PM
MY CAMP HARDY BROTHERS
I WORKED ALONG SIDE THESE TWO GUYS & OTHER STAFF PERSONNEL PREPARING THE COMBAT REACTION COURSE FOR THE MILITARY SPECIAL OPS UNITS THAT WERE THERE FOR THE TRAINING. OUR EOD PEOPLE
SET UP BOOBY TRAPS AND EXPLOSIVES ALONG THE TRAIL IN ORDER TO GIVE THE REALISTIC FEEL OF REAL COMBAT. THIS WAS NO PLACE FOR MISTAKES, THEY WERE USING 
THE REAL STUFF EXCEPT FOR THE BOOBY TRAPS WHERE WE USED GRENADE SIMULATORS AND DET CORD IN PLACE OF HIGH EXPLOSIVES, THAT WAS ON THE JUNGLE TRAIL 
ITSELF. THE HIGH EXPLOSIVES WAS USED ONLY ON THE SIDES OF THE TRAIL PUT IN DEEP WATER HOLES SET TO GO OFF WHEN THE PATROL WAS IN THE MIDDLE OF THE COURSE. BELIEVE 
ME THAT GOT EVERYONES ATTENTION. I WILL POST MORE COMMENTS ON THIS SUBJECT AS I THINK OF THEM, IT'S BEEN A LONG TIME SINCE I WAS THERE: 1969.
Hugh R. TaylorThursday, May 08, 2008 - 9:22 PM
Camp Hardy Info
Looking for anyone else who trained at Camp Hardy, so I can add there 
experiences to the site. 



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<![CDATA[Camp Hardy Combat Training Center 1st SFG/ABN]]>Mon, 07 Jan 2013 00:42:37 GMThttp://oneshotonekill.org/1/post/2013/01/camp-hardy-combat-training-center-1st-sfgabn.htmlPicture
Live Fire Range
"THIS WAS CAMP HARDY'S LIVE FIRE RANGE USED FOR ZEROING WEAPONS AND LIVE FIRE DEMONSTRATIONS
FOR WORLD DIGNITARIES WHO VISITED OUR CAMP FROM
TIME TO TIME.
THERE WAS NOTHING LIKE WATCHING TWO M60'S
FIRING A CRIS CROSS PATTERN OUT INTO THE OCEAN
AT DUSK, WHAT A SHOW. PLEASE ANYONE READING ABOUT THIS CAMP AND KNOWING SOMETHING ABOUT IT, OR
IF YOU TRAINED HERE DURING THE VIETNAM WAR
PLEASE PUT IN YOUR COMMENTS, I WOULD BE HONORED.
I WAS PART OF THE STAFF THERE FROM LATE 1968 TO
1970. SIGNED HUGH R. TAYLOR 1ST SFG/ABN
<< Navigate to Tuesday, June 03, 2008 Add New Comment
Tim KeenanMonday, August 06, 2012 - 6:58 PM
Camp Hardy 1969
I also attended the summer camp at Camp Hardy as a 15 y/o. Our counselor was Sgt Don Valentine 1s. We spent a week at Fort Buckner Jump School and jumped the towers. We recieved weapons training with M-16's & M-79's, land and water survival, a lot of PT as Sgt Valentine wrote he tried to wear us out but didn't manage to. Two years later I enlisted in the Navy and found that basic training was a joke after that summer. Don Valentine has written about this and I'm sure would like to hear from others who attended that summer.Anyone who attended Camp Hardy summer camp, please send me an e mail so we can start a group. Anyone still have the certificates presented to us back then? 

Sincerely Tim Keenan
Dennis V. WiseSaturday, June 25, 2011 - 10:22 AM
Demolition Team
I was a Staff Sergeant in 1971 (1st SF Gp), stationed at Camp Hardy. Our team (Sgt Weaver, SP5 Stuart and others) constructed a live fire confidence course in the "benjo ditch" area to prepare attendees for ambush immediate action. Great professionalism and training
EARL BOWMANThursday, October 21, 2010 - 6:26 PM
CAMP HARDY 69
IT WAS HOT IT TOOK ALL I HAD AND SOME. BUT IT WAS REAL . BOWMANEARL80@YAHOO.COM
EARL BOWMANThursday, October 21, 2010 - 6:23 PM
CAMP HARDY 69
IT WAS HOT IT TOOK ALL I HAD AND SOME. BUT IT WAS REAL . BOWMANEARL80@YAHOO.COM
Andrew M. CianosWednesday, April 07, 2010 - 6:29 AM
Photos
Hugh, I have several photos taken at Camp Hardy. Would like to share them. How do I upload them to your site.
M. QuigleyTuesday, March 10, 2009 - 9:03 PM
Camp Hardy 1968/69
I was fortunate to be associated with a Boy Scout troop sponsored by the 1st SF on Okinawa. We met in a quonset hut in Camp Kue, near the Army Hospital. Maj. "Swede" Nelson was my first scoutmaster, followed by Spec. Fred Lammers. Great training for a kid. Camp Hardy was a special treat. 6 weeks long I recall. One week of survival, one of weapons (great fun!), one of comms (morse code - boring!), etc. Oh, the experience must have made a positive impact on me...I did choose a military career - but in the Coast Guard! Retired as an O-5. Anyone know what became of Maj. Nelson/Spc. Fred Lammers (All I remember is that he was a supply type and that he was from Ohio.)? 
Mike Quigley 
mikequig at juno dot com
M. StewartMonday, January 05, 2009 - 12:25 PM
Camp Hardy 1969
I was one of the kids that spent the summer of '69 at Camp Hardy. Talk about a summer camp! Jumped the towers at Sukiran, skubadived, fired 16's and M-79's.Humped the boonies. Many of our Dads were 5th SF. Now that would not be considered anywhere close to acceptable (or PC) or whatever. I did not follow that path and become a snake-eater but it gave me a taste of what it takes to be one of the best and brightest this country has to offer. When we finished our "summer camp" the SF officer gave the ultimate complement to a bunch of 15-17 year olds when he said he would rather take us down South (to Nam) than any leg grunts. Never forget that. De Opreso Libre. Michael
Hugh R. TaylorMonday, October 15, 2007 - 4:30 PM
Disclaimer
I Hugh R. Taylor do not claim to be anything I'm not. I have official documentation to prove what I have accomplished. Anyone wanting to dispute my claims, be my guest I am up to 
the task. I do not claim to have ever been a Green Beret, I was honored to be attached to the 1st SFG\ABN & the 10th SFG\ABN. I spent most of my military sevice with special forces 
and went thru alot of SF training on Okinawa, I can back this up. This training was provided to me at CAMP HARDY COMBAT TRAINING CENTER OKINAWA 1st SFG\ABN, and the 
special forces jump school at FT. BUCKNER, OKINAWA< that was ran by the first group. 

Sincerely, Hugh R. Taylor


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<![CDATA[Vietnam War Pictures Cont:]]>Fri, 04 Jan 2013 02:37:52 GMThttp://oneshotonekill.org/1/post/2013/01/vietnam-war-pictures-cont.htmlPicture
CH-46 Hellicopter
This is a Chinook Chopper bringing supplies and new troops to the top of Nui Ba Den..The signal core provided communications relay for many patrols in the field and other base camps close by.

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